Police should be looking for a right tit

Some thefts are explained by an obvious economic incentive. Copper, for example.

But breast pumps? What ever happened to the milk of human kindness when thieves start stealing breast-pumps?

The Manawatu was plagued, a few months back, by a group of thieves who stripped down three rural houses of copper in one string of attacks.

Hot-water cylinders, copper pipes and pumps were stolen from inside and outside the empty houses.

Feilding Acting Sergeant Scott Banner said the burglaries were likely connected.

“They’ve been quite extensive. It seems that they have been spending quite a long time at them.

“This is something we really need to stop.”

Rural police patrols had been stepped up, but rural residents also needed to increase their security efforts, he said.

Copper thieves at that time would typically try to sell stolen metal to scrapyards, fetching between $6 and $7 a kilogram.

But despite the best efforts of police, stolen copper can be hard to trace.

Keeping abreast of the news today, Alf was somewhat surprised to learn

A third mobile breast pump has gone missing from Waikato Hospital’s newborn intensive care unit.

Charge nurse Cathy McBride said the pump, worth $3000, was taken sometime between 7pm yesterday and 10am today. Police are investigating and looking at closed circuit television coverage.

The unit, which currently has 42 newborn premature and sick babies, only has one breast pump used by nearly all the mothers. Two old breast pumps, held in storage for emergencies and due for mothballing, are now in use.

Ms McBridge went on to explain how some of the babies were born at 24 weeks so they’re in the unit for 15-20 weeks, and the mums like to express milk for the whole time so that when baby goes home they can continue breast feeding.

On Christmas Eve last year, thieves took two breast pumps from the unit. The Lion Foundation kindly donated funds to purchase two more and that cheque arrived this week, said clinical nurse leader Gem Williams.

“This is just disgraceful,” said Ms Williams.

“I can’t believe anyone would do such a thing. It quite literally breaks our heart.”

Dunno if breast pumps are easier to trace than copper.

As to where they might be sold – well, the Waikato is
dairy country.

But Alf suspects your average cow cockie needs something a tad more efficient than a hospital breast pump to play a meaningful role in the cow shed.

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