Forget what the doctors say about exercise – like cigarettes, it can be bad for your health

He took one swing too many.

Doctors for years have urged Alf to exercise for the sake of his health.

He has been reluctant to do the docs’ bidding and is always suspicious of advice that would reduce the time he can spare for vigorous elbow bending in the Eketahuna Club.

His suspicions have been fortified by the bad experience of a woman in Britain whose doctors advised her to go walking.

Now she is dead.

The exercise thing is seriously over-rated.

Alf became wary after Bing Crosby, one of Mrs Grumble’s heart throbs, suffered a fatal heart attack in 1977 while playing golf near Madrid, in Spain.

He finished 18 holes with a score of 85, and with a partner, defeated two Spanish golf pros. After his last putt, Bing bowed to applause and said, “It was a great game.” He was about 20 yards from the clubhouse, when he collapsed from a massive heart attack.

He was 74.

Much more recently, and much younger, a former Italy Olympic silver medallist, Vigor Bovolenta, died after suffering a heart attack during a fourth-tier volleyball match.

Bovolenta, who was about to turn 38 in May, collapsed on the court during Volley Forli’s visit to Lube Macerata…

Attempts by medics to resuscitate Bovolenta failed and he was pronounced dead after being taken to hospital.

And didn’t Ron Jarden, the great All Black wing, suffer his fatal heart attack after jogging?

Dunno about the statistics in this country.

But according to the Center for Disease Control in the US, 400,000 Americans die every year during exercise, a sporting event or shortly thereafter, of which 100,000 are under the age of 30 and 300,000 are over the age of 30.

With a population of just under 312 million people in the US, this equates to 1 death by exercise out of every 797.5 living people.

Ah, said Alf’s doctor.

But you don’t have to run – a brisk walk once a day will do you good.

Tell that to the 53-year-old woman who was found dead in a field in Darenth Wood Road, near to Darent Valley Hospital, in Dartford, Kent, the other day.

An account of what happened can be found here.

It was reported in The Sun that the woman, from Gravesend in Kent, was a patient at the nearby hospital who had been advised by doctors to take a walk.

She took the advice and is thought to have been savagely kicked to death by a horse.

The mauled body is believed to have been found five hours after the brutal attack with the horse still standing over her.

A spokesman for Kent Police said: ‘It is believed that a stallion in the field where the body was found may have caused her death.

The death is not being treated as suspicious and Duty Inspector Roy Kingston said the stallion has not yet been put down following the incident.

But why should the poor bloody stallion be put down?

The ownership of the animal perhaps has come into considerations.

According to The Sun the horse belongs to gypsies. It is said to have launched at the woman as she walked through the field.

But the doctors who recommended the woman go walking look much more culpable and therefore should be held to account.

If she had stayed safe and snug in her bed, chances are she would be alive today.

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3 Responses to Forget what the doctors say about exercise – like cigarettes, it can be bad for your health

  1. hollyfield01 says:

    “The Giant Book of Fantastic Facts” from about 30 years ago says:
    According to an insurance company, 600 people die each year in West Germany by falling out of bed.
    In 1960 a Middlesex woman talked so loudly in her sleep that she woke herself up, and found that she had dislocated her jaw in her sleep.
    In 1966 Joachim Ziesche (German Ice Hockey player) wrenched his ankle while turning over in bed and put himself out of the ice hockey championships in Yugoslavia.
    A California man sleeping on a sofabed was trapped inside the bed when it closed on its hinges, and a flatmate couldn’t free him. It took firefighters to rescue him from his bed.
    A Sheffield man’s bed collapsed and he became imprisioned in tangled bed-springs. He was trapped for five days before neighbours became puzzled by his absence and investigated.

    And from ACC last year: “7,600 people met a bed fall injury that comes to 146 people in a week. The victims of bed fall were not only children and elderly people, but 1800 out of 7,600 people belonging to the age group of 25 and 64.”

  2. hollyfield01 says:

    From ACC in 2011: “According to the data of ACC, 7,600 people met a bed fall injury – 146 people in a week. The victims of bed fall were not only children and elderly people, but 1800 out of 7,600 people belonging to the age group of 25-64.”

    And from “The Giant Book of Fantastic Facts” from about 25-30 years ago:
    According to an insurance company, 600 people die each year in West Germany by falling out of bed
    A Sheffield man’s bed collapsed and he became imprisioned in tangled bedsprings. He was trapped for 5 days before neighbours became puzzled by his absence and investigated.
    A California man, sleeping on a sofabed, became trapped when the bed closed on its hinges. His flatmate could not free him, and he was eventually rescued by firefighters.
    In August 1960 a Middlesex woman was talking so loudly in her sleep that she woke herself up, and discovered she had dislocated her jaw.
    In 1966 Joachim Ziesche (German ice hockey player) turned over in bed, wrenching his ankle, and put himself out of the ice hockey championships in Yugoslavia.

  3. PhilBeeNZ says:

    The gypsies are to blame! Nuke ’em all, I say!!

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