Can’t afford a $3 prescription fee? Bollocks – just check out the empties behind their houses

How much is a 1.5 litre bottle of Coca-Cola nowadays?

Depends on where you buy it, of course, but the Glengarry mob (here) are flogging it for $4.75.

So how many customers will they get from among the poverty-stricken Porirua people who can’t afford $3 for a prescription drug?

The question is raised by the report here about prescriptions piling up at a Porirua pharmacy.

The reason? Patients say they can’t afford the $3 fee.

And as the pharmacist points out, it’s only going to get worse when fees increase on January 1.

Pharmacist Kas Govind said between five and seven people a day were not collecting their filled prescriptions from Cannons Creek Pharmacy, many because they did not have the money to pay.

Some people with prescriptions for multiple medications would pay for one or two items, leaving the rest uncollected or for a later date.

Your Government – proudly served by Alf – announced in May it would increase the fee to $5, using the extra revenue to boost other healthcare needs.

This Govind feller expects the problem of uncollected prescriptions to worsen when the increase came into effect.

But no matter.

There are do-gooders galore, out there in the community.

One resident , shocked by the amount of uncollected medication sitting on shelves, asked the community via a Porirua Facebook page to donate money.

More than $250 had been raised since Saturday, including one donation of $100, which would be used to pay for people’s prescriptions if they couldn’t afford it, Mr Govind said.

It seems this is not just a Porirua phenomenon.

Pharmacy Guild executive chairwoman Karen Crisp said it was an issue across the country that was likely to get worse with the fee increase.

“It depends on individual priorities and varies from person to person.

“Some areas have more problems than others.

“Price is a barrier to people collecting prescriptions,” she said.

The aforementioned Govind feller fears many of the patients who are going without their medication will end up in hospital with more serious illnesses.

Skin infections, eczema and respiratory illnesses were common in the low-socio economic area, and not treating them early often led to kidney problems.

“There are two questions: why do they not pick them up, and why do they only pick some up and not the lot?

“Is it finance? Is it a lack of priority for health and wellbeing? Is it – I don’t know. I’m assuming it’s finance.”

Alf accepts finance may be the problem in a few cases.

But for the most part, he reckons it’s a matter of the Porirua people deciding to give a higher budgetary priority to booze, Coca-Cola and Big Macs than to prescriptions.

He is apt to liken the do-gooders in this story to those who helped a South Auckland family of 13 avoid eviction by transforming their Housing New Zealand home, bringing it up to proper living standards.

Whale Oil regaled us with the story (here) this week

The Flat Bush Neighbourhood Policing Team gained the support of the local community and businesses to upgrade the home, which was in such a poor state of repair the family was on its last chance with HNZ.

Constable Karen Ancell said 11 children lived at the house with their 32-year-old mother who was pregnant.

“We have stepped in to get the house up to scratch so the family can make a fresh start,” Ancell said.

“They are struggling, to say the least, and some of the children are starting to come to police attention.”

More than 40 volunteers helped with the make over while businesses donated materials and services.

The volunteers fumigated the house, repaired damaged walls and painted the interior. Outside they tidied the grounds, erected raised garden beds and planted vegetables.

Police, Salvation Army and Habitat for Humanity representatives also donated furnishings to completely refurnish the house.

The community’s input for a family they had never met was huge, Ancell added.

“It’s about giving a family a fresh start. They are in a good place to change now, whereas in the past that hasn’t been the case.”

But giving them a home they can be proud of is just the first step. The police are also working to give the family the tools to become good members of society.

Whale Oil spluttered with indignation.

Where do I start with this:

It isn’t their home that just got fixed up…it is ours, that they destroyed in the first place.

32 years old and 11 Kids and number 12 on the way…WTF! Does she flip it for anyone who wants to run one up her?

Where is/are the fathers?

If they are struggling it is their own bloody fault…contraception is far cheaper than 12 bloody kids…she has chosen poverty because she chose to flip it up.

How much welfare is poured into that household?

What on earth is going to make this indigent family change their ways? THey have learned a valuable lesson though…if you live like a pig then someone will come along and make it all right again.

FFS…there is no way that 12 kids is a mistake…unless you are the stupidest person in the world.

Gotta say he’s made lots of good points there with typical Whale Oily eloquence.

And similar thoughts can be expressed about those who find a better way to spend $3 than on their health.

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