Bad buggers will now find it that much harder to persuade the Parole Board to give them a break

February 25, 2015

Alf looks forward to returning home at the end of the week to bask in the acclamation of his mates in the Eketahuna Club. They are tough on law and order and will be chuffed about the passage of some legislation dealing with parole hearings.

The Bill was aimed at reducing the number of unnecessary parole hearings for offenders who still pose a threat to the community.

It increases the maximum interval between hearings from one year to two years. For serious offenders on indeterminate sentences – such as life imprisonment or preventive detention – or sentences of 10 or more years, the maximum time between parole hearings increases from three to five years.

The Bill also includes a range of measures to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the parole system.

Helped by an “aye” vote from Alf, it passed its third and final reading in Parliament last night.

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Sort it out, Amy – and give judges back the power to decide when restorative justice should kick in

January 29, 2015

Alf would have counselled Restorative Justice Aotearoa to lie low and stay stum about changes to the Sentencing Act, which came into effect on Monday 6 December.

As a namby-pamby bunch on law-and-order matters, they were unlikely to be too fussed about the backlog of cases building up in the courts. And of justice delays being justice denied.

They put their emphasis on the changes to the Sentencing Act being intended to make restorative justice services more accessible in the District Court.

This – of course – means work and more money for their members.

The changes have stripped judges of their discretion to decide if restorative justice process is appropriate.

Moreover South Island lawyers are complaining that Christchurch’s restorative justice programme is so under-resourced that every week it falls another six weeks behind.

Amy Adams is going to check it out. 

 

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Come on Amy – let’s scrap these restorative justice rules instead of waiting to see if they work

January 16, 2015

No, not all judges get it right – certainly not nearly as often as Alf would like.

But when it comes to who should decide when a cup of tea and a cosy chat is an appropriate way of sorting things out between victim and offender, we politicians seem to have seriously stuffed things up in June last year when we tinkered with the Sentencing Act.

We gave the job of deciding restorative justice is the way to go in a case to a touchy feely bunch of tossers who happen to be the providers of the restorative justice process that will be followed whenever someone pleads guilty.

It’s a bit like legislatively deciding that ice-cream vendors should decide when people should be required to eat ice-cream, then sending the bill to the taxpayers.

What a joke.

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Yep, they were here first, and now they want to cash in on the radio waves (as our partners, of course)

July 21, 2013

The Wall Street Journal has caught up with the fact we have some special people in New Zealand, although it calls these special people our first people.

The hack who wrote the article said here it wasn’t uncommon for indigenous groups to claim rights to a nation’s raw materials.

But she is surprised – it seems – that in New Zealand, Maori tribes are asserting ownership of a much more unusual resource: Radio waves.

Maybe she would not be surprised if she knew there has been a misunderstanding about the role played in the development of radio by a bloke generally known as Marconi, who is credited with doing important pioneering work on long distance radio transmission and for his development of Marconi’s law and a radio telegraph system.

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What’s that strong pong of hypocrisy? Ah, it’s coming from Goff’s housing arrangements

December 17, 2010

The taxpayers keep filling this one for me, so why should I feed from my own trough?

Alf can’t say it better than Whaleoil, when it comes to discussing the rank hypocrisy of Labour’s Phil Goff. Constituents should read his post on the subject today.

Essentially, Whaleoil reminds us how Labour has persistently been putting the boot into our Bill English over the double dipping thing, perfectly legal though it happened to be.

But – as we learned last night – Goff is up to much the same sort of lark.

Alf will only add to Whaleoil’s account that he was thoroughly pissed off in the House this week when Amy Adams was doing a splendid job of extracting important stuff from English about the economy at Question Time.

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