Mayor Judd favours doing things by halves – and he wants all of NZ to accept his power-sharing model

November 24, 2014
And then I have this idea of reserving all council seats for the tangata whenua...

And then I have this idea of putting all council seats aside for the tangata whenua…

About two months ago, the Mayor of New Plymouth was getting kudos from the Maori Party – and no doubt from lots of other Maori leaders – for acknowledging that our indigenous persons are special and should be given special treatment.

His council had just voted for a Maori ward by seven votes to six.

But he was getting plenty of stick, too, from folks who had the temerity to be miffed at the Mayor’s tinkering with their democratic structure (and doing it on the strength of a very close vote)..

One councillor – a true democrat – had the balls to oppose the move and resigned in protest.

The mayor, Andrew Judd, showed troubling signs of being confused about what he was up to.

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John McLeod is branded a renegade – just for resigning over the introduction of race-based voting

September 25, 2014
No, he didn't burn down the council chambers.

No, he didn’t burn down the council chambers.

It’s a measure of the magnitude of the Kiwi surrender to the power push by indigenous persons that New Plymouth councillor John McLeod is described as a renegade.

That derogatory adjective was used in a caption beneath his photo in the Taranaki Daily News before he resigned “after the vote on Maori wards did not go his way”.

Renegade?

According to the definition at Oxforddctionaries.com a renegade is…

A person who deserts and betrays an organization, country, or set of principles: an agent who later turns out to be a renegade

So has John McLeod deserted the New Plymouth Council or his city?

Or has he betrayed it or its principles?

It depends.

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What’s that cry from New Plymouth? It’s a lament for the further dismantling of our democracy

April 14, 2014

It’s a struggle for the champions of democracy to stem the rising tide of co-governance arrangements that make a sham of electing our councillors and (before long, you can be sure) members of Parliament.

They have cause to feel like that Canute feller trying to hold back the incoming tide.

Trouble is, being a champion of democracy can’t be squared with the modern-day need to recognise that our indigenous people are special people.

Democrats expose themselves to the charge they are racist and reactionary if they resist proposals to appoint our special people directly to positions of power and influence in our governance arrangements.

They certainly have been chided by a New Plymouth city councillor for having the gall to resist giving local iwi members a very special place – and very special privileges – in the city’s decision-making system.

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