Some stuff is best read for laughs, including advice to take the Internet Party seriously

May 31, 2014
Sadly, he is not on the Internet Mana list.

Sadly, he is not on the Mana Internet list.

Alf enjoys humour so was immediately tempted to look for the laughs that were bound to be extracted from a Herald item under the headline:

John Armstrong: Internet Mana best taken seriously

Armstrong is a political writer for whom Alf might have a higher regard were he to take some note of the Eketahuna North member’s words of wisdom, which flow regularly in speeches in the House, on the hustings and to mates in the Eketahuna Club, but are never recorded by the aforementioned political writer.

This lack of an appreciation for powerful and well-considered rhetoric means Alf reads Armstrong only for the chuckles.

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A marriage of mana and money makes a moaning minnie of – guess who? Yep – Sue

May 27, 2014

And so the decision has been made.

The Internet Party and Mana Party have teamed up for this year’s election.

Alf and his fellow Nats are feeling seriously unthreatened.

Hone Harawira will be top dog in this odd coupling – he will have top billing on the alliance’s party list.

Mana has given up the number two spot on their combined list to the Internet Party’s leader, who will be named tomorrow (or so we are assured).

This is all too much for dear old Sue Bradford to stomach. She has spat the dummy – as she warned she would – and quit the Mana Party.

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Tua fancies entering the political ring for a Maori party – but he isn’t too fussy about which one

December 21, 2013

Recently retired pugilist David Tua is obviously a man of great principle.

His principle is to join up with any political party, so long as it is a Maori party. Whether it leans to the right, the left or wherever is neither here nor there to him.

And so – we learn here today – he has talked with the Maori Party about entering politics.

And just to show how adept he is at ducking and weaving, he will be talking with Hone Harawira’s Mana Party next month.

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Why “Waitangi” Day? The shit-stirring calls for a more appropriate name

February 3, 2012

Welcome to the marae, John...


Dunno why we bother calling it Waitangi Day.

It has become an occasion – in the Far North, anyway – for unseemly shit-stirring.

Accordingly we should think about calling it something more appropriate, like Maori Malevolence Day.

Hone Hawawira’s gaggle of malcontents is promising another dose of aggravation this weekend.

The Mana Party is warning Prime Minister John Key will get a hostile reception at Waitangi this weekend as anger among Maori grows over the potential removal of Treaty rights and cutbacks at the Maori Affairs Ministry, Te Puni Kokiri.

Mana spokesman Malcolm Mulholland said this morning Key was walking into “a perfect storm”.

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Mana needs to hone its analytical skills – and it should be more wary of positive poll portents next time

November 29, 2011

"It's mum...she reckons we've got enough seats for me to be the Prime Minister."

A capacity for good political analysis seems to be lacking within the Mana Party.

The buggers are arguing the toss today about whether the election result was good or bad for them, after leader Hone Harawira reclaimed his Te Tai Tokerau seat, but the party failed to capture enough of the party vote to bring a second MP into Parliament.

Co-president Annette Sykes was in the latter group, saying she was “far from disappointed”.

Given that the party was formed only seven months before the election, 20,000 votes was a huge achievement.

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Forget about the the Maori and Mana Parties – let’s study Act’s cunning plans to win Maori votes

July 11, 2011

Alf is surprised it took the Maori Party more than two minutes to reject a proposed deal by the Mana Party not to stand against each other in the Maori electorates at this year’s general election.

Mind you, he must acknowledge that maybe it didn’t take that long.

Whatever happened, we learn from Stuff today that representatives from both parties met in Rotorua last week in an attempt to heal the rift which has been growing since Hone Harawira quit the Maori Party in February over its support of the National-led government.

As Stuff reminds us, it culminated with name-calling and heckling from both sides during last month’s Tai Tokerau by-election campaign.

Having vilified his former colleagues and won the seat, Hone extended an olive branch to meet and put the parties’ differences between them before November’s election.

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Hone’s antics have highlighted the way his people are given more choices than the rest of us

May 9, 2011

But one stands to the left and one to the right.

Alf is delighted to see Maori are blessed with so much choice.

Their options have been illustrated by Hone Harawira’s decision to set up the Mana Party. This means Maori can vote for a Maori Party candidate in the Maori electorates, if they want to support an outfit that unabashedly pitches its policies to promote Maori interests, or they can vote for the Mana Party, which unabashedly pitches its policies to promote Maori interests.

It looks like Tweedledum and Tweedldee, but if you look real hard one of them stands to the left and the other to the right.

Then comes a choice that is denied the rest of us.

Maori can sign up on the general roll or the Maori roll.

If Hone gets around to forcing a by-election in his Tai Tokerau electorate, it will be a Maori-only affair, unlike – let’s say – the recent Mana by-election. In Mana, all voters on the general roll could vote for candidates from a range of ethnic backgrounds championing a range of party philosophies and policies. The line-up included the admirable Hekia Parata.

Mind you, if Hone is as bright as he is infuriatingly irritating, he will take note that maybe he won’t get too many brownie points for forcing a costly by-election on his people – and the costs of it on all of us.

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