Michael Bay might be the bloke we need to transform our public service (and make it bleed)

March 3, 2012

Stripping our public service to bare essentials is not so easy.


The public service has been doing a lot of yelping for an outfit that has shed bugger-all blood.

One of the top manadarins has revealed that the squeeze on state service backroom functions has saved just $20 million in two years.

Or $10 million a year.

Let’s stack that alongside soccer celebrity David Beckham’s earnings of $US40 million last year…

The story about the scant savings made so far in the Government’s assault on public service profligacy is told at Stuff today –

The Government has shed more than 2500 jobs in the past three years and ordered chief executives to shave their IT and human resources bills as part of a drastic overhaul of the public service.

But despite ambitious plans to save $1billion over three years, a `benchmarking’ report to be published next week will show 31 agencies and departments have managed to reduce spending by just $20m.

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If you thought there was something sick about the public service, it turns out you probably were right

August 21, 2011

It looks like our public servants are a bunch of skivers, unless – of course – you are a leftie tosser and maintain they are stressed and overworked.

Take your pick.

Whether or not they are as healthy as workers in the private sector may well be arguable, but they are much more likely to take time off when they are (or they profess to be) sick.

The SST tells us the difference in a report today –

Public servants averaged 7.7 sick days each last year, compared with 5.3 days for workers in the private sector.

These figures apparently come from The National Employers’ wage and salary survey, based on interviews of more than 39,000 employees.

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Besides the quake, there’s news about the foreshore furore, charitable fund-raising and PSA pique

February 23, 2011

The NZ public is understandably focused on the disastrous earthquake and its aftermath in Christchurch. The media is appropriately focused there, too.

Some important bits of news accordingly might escape public attention.

In the last hour or so, for example, Scoop posted a summary of Māori submissions on the Marine and Coastal Bill was released.

This is a summary of the 72 submissions received by the Māori Affairs Select Committee from marae, hapū, iwi, Māori land owners, organisations and collectives. It does not include those submissions made by Māori individuals. It has been prepared by a collective of concerned people, Kaitiaki o te Takutai, who wanted to know what hapū and iwi said about the Marine and Coastal Bill. It is our hope that their voices will be listened to.

The important thing is that all submitters said they were opposed to the Foreshore Seabed Act 2004 and supported its repeal.

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Without a good old-fashioned blood-letting at the Ministry of Health, how will it get better?

December 18, 2010

But if there are no bits left over, won't the restructuring be a waste of time?

Dunno what exactly is going at the Ministry of Health.

It certainly doesn’t look like a blood-letting.

But the Public Service Association is bleating that “a substantial number of redundancies” may result from the latest restructuring.

According to Radio New Zealand –

Uncertainty surrounds the future of many jobs at the ministry, which is introducing a new policy advice structure in February.

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